Ethiopiques

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  • 5
    #1749
    toastedcarrot
    Participant
    Rank: Droplet
    Points: 27.5

    Ethiopiques are volumes of Ethiopian jazz dating back to early/mid 70’s. There are about 30 volumes in total. I became entranced with Ethiopian music when discovering Mulatu Astatke 5 or so years ago, and  I can’t help but play his song “Tezeta” at least once a day. I had never heard melodies like this before and wanted to know why these Ethiopian jazz artists sounded superior to any other music I had ever heard. Something about it. I can cry to it, I can laugh to it, I can cook to it… I just can’t get enough.

    After some digging, I discovered why Ethiopian jazz is in fact so enchanting, and that it is one of the most beautiful forms of protest to ever exist.

    In the 70’s, during the Derg Regime, the Ethiopian government banned all music with lyrics that did not praise the government. They threw lyricists in jail and many musicians were forced to have exclusively government praising lyrics. However this mandate, in the form the government so desired, didn’t last long. That is until Father of Post-Derg Regime Ethiopian Jazz himself, Mulatu Astake, took matters into his own hands. He began composing the funkiest, warmest, most ethereal jazz the country had ever seen – containing no lyrics. His response sparked a chain reaction throughout the Ethiopian jazz community, with many artists following suit. One of these artists is Emahoy Tsegué-Maryam Guèbrou, a jazzy nun. I first discovered Emahoy on an Ethiopiques album a few years ago. I quickly learned she was the mastermind behind “Mother’s Love”, a must listen to.

    Last week, her posthumous album, “Souvenirs” released. It is as angelic, warm and as cradling as “Mother’s Love“. If you are intrigued by this genre of music that is as soul saving as it is funky, I’d suggest dipping your toe in by starting with “Ethiopiques, Vol. 4: Ethio Jazz 1969-1974“. From there you can discover different Ethiopian Jazz artists and embark on what I’d say is a lifelong journey of appreciation for adaptations of jazz. Enjoy.

    1
    #2185
    chubes
    HMFIC
    Rank: Frozen Foods Isle
    Points: 10369.25

    Yo, I know it’s like 5am but I’m listening to Ethiopiques right now. It’s kind of perfect vibes for this time of night/day/morning. Thank you for sharing and for the detailed info on it. Love it

    0
    #2283
    toastedcarrot
    Participant
    Rank: Droplet
    Points: 27.5

    chubes said:

    Yo, I know it’s like 5am but I’m listening to Ethiopiques right now. It’s kind of perfect vibes for this time of night/day/morning. Thank you for sharing and for the detailed info on it. Love it

    <iframe style=”border-radius: 12px;” title=”Spotify Embed: Ethiopiques, Vol. 4: Ethio Jazz 1969-1974″ src=”https://open.spotify.com/embed/album/5VKvVk4gaPAJyXjof8NnzX?si=XEhls7BcTcu_DvLkarK12w&utm_source=oembed&#8221; width=”100%” height=”352″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen” data-mce-fragment=”1″></iframe>

    Exactly. When my mind needs something easy, its a good pick. Try Hailu Mergia & Dahlak Band’s album, Wede Harer Guzo next. It’s the perfect album for these rising temps and sunny afternoons.

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